Village Alive Trust
Village Alive Trust

Cwm Farm Cider House....

Download the leaflet in pdf file format (print both sides)

The Cwm Farm, Llangattock Lingoed, is largely unchanged since its construction around 1750. The Grade 2* listed buildings comprise a farmhouse, cider house and barn in a U-shaped group around a farmyard. The Farm is being managed to promote traditional farming practices and land conservation, supported by the Welsh Office Tir Gofal scheme. Under this scheme, hedges are being laid and traditional gates and stiles replaced. The surrounding land comprises semi-improved pasture and cider fruit orchards containing ancient trees, which still produce fruit for a local perry maker.

Cider Mill
The Mill
Cider Press
Cider Press

The Cwm Farm Cider House — a large 18th century stone built cider house with its original press and crusher in situ, alongside a baking oven and many other accessories of traditional farm produce — was in urgent need of repair. The Cwm Farm Barn was also in need of urgent attention to prevent collapse. The end gable, which had collapsed, was taken down and rebuilt, the press repaired and a new floor fitted to the loft.

Gable end reconstruction
Gable end reconstruction
Repairing the press
Repairing the press
Gable end complete
Gable end complete
Loft
Loft
Visitors enjoying an Open Day
Visitors enjoying an Open Day

VIDEO: Spring in a Traditional Perry Pear Orchard

VIDEO: Cwm Farm Perry Harvest - Nov 2013

VIDEO: The Fullbrook Stream

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT WELSH CIDER AND PERRY HERE

This project has been financed by the Welsh Assembly
Government and managed by the Welsh Development Agency
under the Article 33 Rural Development Plan for Wales.

Ariennir y prosiect hwn gan Lywodraeth Cynulliad Cymru ac
fe'i rheolir gan Awdurdod Datblygu Cymru dan y Cymllun
Datblygu Gwledig Cymru Erthygl 33.

Welsh Development AgencyWelsh Assembly GovernementEU

The New Inn Well House....

Download the leaflet in pdf file format (print both sides)

The well house at New Inn is an eighteenth-century Grade II Listed Building. In the last 50 years, since the well house stopped being used to supply water to the former public house, the building had deteriorated to a fragile condition and was in danger of being lost. The front wall had collapsed and the roof had become overgrown and near to falling in. The owner had battled to preserve as much as possible, but with limited funds.

In 2004 the newly formed Village Alive Trust, as a Building Preservation Trust, took on the task of raising funds to restore the building, to make it safe and accessible, and to preserve this rare and unusual example of our rural heritage.

Working from photographs taken when the building was standing, the New Inn well house has been restored using traditional methods and materials. The penetrating roots of the overgrowth have been removed. The original building stones, fortunately retained on site, have been re-used and, with lime mortar, render and wash the well house has been restored. The specialist contractor's mason has rebuilt the roof and front wall to its original design. The project has been overseen by a conservation architect and was completed in August 2005.

The well house before restoration ...

Well House Front Old
Well House Front Old
Well House Back Old
Well House Back Old

New Inn farmhouse was originally a coach house. The New Inn, built about 500 years ago on the main route from Monmouth to the Abergavenny-Grosmont road. In 1954 the Graig Estate sold off its land holding in Monmouthshire as smaller parcels of farmland, the then landlord living in Australia. The New Inn, as a public house and farm, was purchased by the parents of the current owner. The well house formed a part of that parcel and continued to be the main water supply to the public house. The following year the New Inn ceased trading as a public house and concentrated on its farming business. It still relied on the well house for its water until the mid 1960's, when the supply became inconsistent. Other arrangements were sought until mains water was introduced in the 1970's.

The well house, now about 200 years old, had started to fail. The fresh water was leaking away and ground water seeping back in from the surrounding soil. Without proper maintenance the structure started to deteriorate, became overgrown and eventually unstable. The front wall collapsed. However, the collapse of the front wall has provided a view of how the building was originally put together.

Internally the well house measures 3.5m x 3.2m and is over 2m below ground level at the rear wall. The water level came to about 1.5m deep, providing a reservoir capacity of about 17,000 litres (3,700 gallons). The structure is of stone build, probably locally quarried Old Red Sandstone, the lower walls formed in 'random rubble - brought to courses' held together with a traditional lime mortar. The cistern was lime plastered to just above the maximum capacity level. The lime mortar and render would have had a water-resistant additive, such as tallow. Lime is antiseptic, which would benefit the quality of the water. The ceiling was lime-washed, again the properties of the lime providing an anti-fungal finish.

The vaulted ceiling is constructed with pitched stonework, above which is a triangular void running the full length of the building. This may have been a method of reducing the amount of stone needed, or it could have been part of an ingenious method of moderating the temperature inside the building. The outer roof slopes are also of pitched stone, helping to key-in the masonry with its rubble core. The ridge is formed with a 'dressed' capping. On reconstruction a tiny cross was discovered carved into the face of the front stone.

The building itself is intriguing. It was clearly built to serve the coach-house. But close to the road opposite the house is a small well, which once had a pump, and the horse troughs are still visible. This small well is independent of the well house, fed by other springs from the hillside, suggesting the well house water was perhaps 'different' to the horses' water supply and maybe even special. There are local tales about 'special' water connected with New Inn.

Old photographs of the well house taken before the front wall collapsed show the rectangular niche that has been reconstructed above the opening. We are unsure of its purpose and can only speculate at this time, but it may have housed a statuette of a local saint or possibly St. Christopher, the patron saint of travellers. The Baylis family, owners of the well house, and the Trust commissioned a sculpture to fit in the niche at the front of the building. This interpretation of St Christopher is by the sculptor, Philip Chatfield, who has also carved a Virgin and Child for St Mary’s Church, Monmouth, and figures for the town’s restored St Thomas’ Cross.

Well House After
Well House After
Well House View
Well House View
St Christopher
St Christopher

Well House Official Opening

The well house at New Inn Farm was officially opened on 28 August 2005, when the owners and the Village Alive Trust signed a 10-year agreement allowing public access to the site.

Well House Open
Well House Open
Well House Open
Well House Open

Click here for our press release

This project has been financed by the Welsh Assembly
Government and managed by the Welsh Development Agency
under the Article 33 Rural Development Plan for Wales.

Ariennir y prosiect hwn gan Lywodraeth Cynulliad Cymru ac
fe'i rheolir gan Awdurdod Datblygu Cymru dan y Cymllun
Datblygu Gwledig Cymru Erthygl 33.

Welsh Development AgencyWelsh Assembly GovernementEU

Barn at Great Trerhew Farm....

Please note that the barn is on private land on a working farm and is not available for public viewing except at designated times.

The barn at Great Tre-Rhew Farm, Llantilio Crossenny is listed Grade 2* and is possibly the last barn of this quality remaining in agricultural use in the county, if not in south Wales. The barn dates from the late 16th century and was probably originally wholly timber framed. It seems to have been extended in the late 17th century and now has eight bays with two kingpost trusses, gabled additions with cider mill and press, cattle stalls, stable and haylofts with stone chaff bin. The barn is constructed of rubble stone walling with a slate roof. It has a stone-flagged threshing floor and a lofted cowhouse. The entrance to the cider house is built into the step wall on the ground floor. It has a four-light diamond mullion window and still contains the large mill stone with wooden drive shaft and its cider press. Adjoining to the north is a yard enclosed by cattle pens with pent roofs supported by rounded stone pillars and a couple of smaller barns (also listed). The farm buildings are sited alongside a house with medieval foundations.

Date Stone 1696
Date Stone 1696

This badly eroded date stone - now sadly completely worn away - shows the date 1696 and probably commemorates the building of the gables and perhaps other extensions.

The initials J M P are those of John Price and his wife Mary, who owned the farm from about 1675, when John acquired the estate from his mother-in-law (also a member of the Price family), to John's death in 1707.

As the pictures below show, although it was still in use, by 2005 the barn had fallen into a dilapidated state, with many missing or loose tiles and serious structural problems with the gable ends. Unless repairs could be undertaken urgently it was quite likely that the barn could soon begin to fall into ruin.

BEFORE

BEFORE - South-western elevation (cider house on right)
BEFORE - South-western elevation (cider house on right)
3 BEFORE - South-eastern elevation
3 BEFORE - South-eastern elevation
BEFORE - Interior
BEFORE - Interior
AFTER - South-western elevation (cider house on right)
AFTER - South-western elevation (cider house on right)
AFTER - Interior
AFTER - Interior
AFTER
AFTER

AFTER

Great Tre-Rhew Barn Preservation

A contract was awarded to Thorteck Ltd to undertake, as a first phase, emergency repairs to three of the gables. Work started on 12 February 2007 and finished on 31 March.

Pre Contract
Pre Contract

The on-site pre-contract group meeting:

Anne and Trevor Beavan (owners)

Patti Griffiths (Village Alive)

Stefan Horowskyj (architect)

Steve Burchell (Thorteck)

 

Demolition of two of the gables was soon well under way . . .

Demolition South
Demolition South
Demolition West
Demolition West

. . quickly followed by their rebuilding . . .

Rebuilt South
Rebuilt South
Rebuild West
Rebuild West

. . . and completion.

Rebuilt Gable
Rebuilt Gable
Rebuilt Gable
Rebuilt Gable

Following the emergency repairs to rebuild gable ends and support part of the roof, the Trust negotiated a 25-year lease and a licence to use for agricultural purposes to safeguard the structure and community access to the barn. The Architectural Heritage Fund supported an Options Appraisal which formed the basis of bids for further funding.

The project received funding through the Rural Development Plan for Wales 2007-2013, funded by the Welsh Assembly Government and the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development, grants from Cadw, Monmouthshire County Council and private donations. This funding enabled complete conservation of the barn and re-instatement of the threshing doors and gable-end doors together with conservation of the integral Cider House creating a room from the tollet floor above for use by visiting groups.

The conserved barn was 'opened' in September 2009 with events featuring maypole dancing by local children (part of a three-year programme by the Trust to re-introduce maypole dancing into the primary school) and a Harvest Home, featured in the Abergavenny Food Festival Fringe programme, to showcase local food and Perry.

The Trust commissioned a DVD about the conservation project and will show this in part of the barn, with interpretation, as part of its educational programme for visiting groups. The barn was the setting for the first and second Monmouthshire Pear and Perry Festival, sponsored by the Welsh Assembly Government, held in 2010 and 2011, in partnership with the Welsh Perry and Cider Society and adventa Monmouthshire's Leader Plus programme.

A ‘Land and Legends Trail’ sponsored by Monmouthshire Leader Plus programme gives visitors the choice of two circular walks taking in the farm, mill site and nearby White Castle (in the care of Cadw).

This project has received funding through the Rural Development Plan for Wales 2007-2013 which is funded by the Welsh Government and the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development.

Cyllidwyd y prosiect hwn drwy Gynllun Datblygu Gwledig Cymru 2007-2013 a ariennir gan Lywodraeth Cymru a’r Gronfa Amaethyddol Ewrop ar gyfer Datblygu Gwledig.

CadwAdventaWelsh Development AgencyWelsh Assembly GovernmentEU

Smaller Projects....

Cross Ash Well House

(GR SO406199)

The unusual stone pyramid building is still in working order as a well house and was the village’s source of water before the mains supply was installed. The small building can easily be viewed from the road (layby nearby) and now carries a plaque commemorating its restoration by the Trust.

This second well house restoration at Cross Ash was unveiled on Easter Saturday 2006.

Press Release.

Cross Ash Well
Cross Ash Well
Cross Ash Well
Cross Ash Well

Llanfair Cilgoed Grange

(GR SO390192)

The site of the ancient chapel has been cleared of undergrowth and enclosed with railing to prevent damage by stock.

More Information

Llanfair Railings
Llanfair Railings

Traveller's Seat Stone

Letravane Seat Stone
Letravane Seat Stone

(GR SO425183)

Near Lettravane Farm, at a sharp bend on what was once the main stage coach route from London via Gloucester and Brecon to Milford Haven, this stone marks the site of a seat for waiting travellers.

The inscription reads:

Travellrs Seat, erected 1780, to New Inn 2 miles, from thence to Crickhowell 13½ miles, Brecon miles 12, to Ross miles 10 from thence to Gloucester miles 16, from Gloucester to Brecknock 54 miles

There is no reference to Abergavenny, which suggests that here a road branched off to go via Llanfihangel Crucorney and so avoid the town. This, and the distance of two miles, would be consistent with "New Inn" being the one at which the Trust has restored the well house.

The stone and the inscription had become badly eroded. The Trust funded temporary removal and restoration work on the stone and the provision of more adequate protection from the weather now it has been returned.

Little Cwm Cider Mill

(GR SO358199)

A little further along the lane beyond Cwm Farm Cider House, are the remains of another cider house. The site has been tidied and the mill stones set up to show how they would once have been.

The Mill, Great Trerhew Farm

(GR SO374176)

GREAT TRERHEW MILL is the site of a water mill close to the White Castle providing vital supplies of flour to the garrison. A mill on this site dates back around 800 years and was operated by a system of water channels and a mill pond to provide power to grind corn.

The earliest references to a mill serving White Castle come from the 1291 accounts, which note that ‘The same renders account of 20s. from the farm of the mill for the year’ (Roderick and Rees 1950: 1-46). Although not specific about which farm this is, later evidence shows that this is the only recorded mill in close proximity to the castle. White Castle was originally built in timber and rebuilt in stone in the later part of the 12th century. The castle was kept in repair at least until mid 1400s, but by 1538 it was recorded as disused and abandoned. This means that the mill could have provided flour for the garrison for around 300 years.

Great Trerhew Mill is of the type known as an Overshot Mill, which is the most proficient of the watermills; it does however require a head of water from a higher point in order to power the wheel from above. Here, in order to ensure a strong power supply throughout the year, water was channelled along the ridge behind the farmhouse to a large mill pond. A sluice controlled the flow of water onto a large overshot water wheel which rested in the pit below. There would also be a bypass sluice to help control the flow of water in times of heavy rain. The overshot wheel has wooden troughs or buckets which fill up one by one and it is the weight of the falling water which actually turns the wheel. The large wheel was connected to a drive wheel, which turned the grinding stones in the mill alongside. The miller and his family lived in a cottage adjoining the mill. The mill house was still occupied in the 1950s. Later, the local authority required the roof to be removed and the buildings fell into ruin.

In 2005, the Welsh Mills Society recorded the site before the Trust erected a story board giving information to visitors and walkers on the Three Castles Walk which passes the site.

Upper White Castle Farm Pigscotts

(GR SO381167)

The stone pigscotts are detached from other buildings, near the road, at the end of a range of stone farm buildings still in agricultural use. The building is constructed in sandstone with a pitched roof. It is divided into three separate pens, each with an adjoining yard and a stone chute for feed built into the outer wall. Internally, the roof construction comprises a central ridge board with a purlin to each side and exposed rafters. The roof is finished with Roman pan tiles on the north west elevation and slate to the south east. The inner walls are lime washed. The structure is single storey and listed Grade II.

The owners approached the Trust for help with conserving the building and contributed to the Condition Survey and repairs supervised by Morgan and Horowskyj Architects, Abergavenny. The schedule of works included replacing cracked roof slates and re-bedding ridge tiles; selected timber renewal and treatment; removal of plant growth, re-pointing walls and masonry repairs; interior lime wash and re-instating a door to each pen. Conservation was completed in 2009 and the pigscotts may be viewed on the Trust Open Days.

[This project has received funding through the Rural Development Plan for Wales 2007-2013 which is funded by the Welsh Government and the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development.
Cyllidwyd y prosiect hwn drwy Gynllun Datblygu Gwledig Cymru 2007-2013 a ariennir gan Lywodraeth Cymru a’r Gronfa Amaethyddol Ewrop ar gyfer Datblygu Gwledig.]

This project has been financed by the Welsh Assembly

Government and managed by the Welsh Development Agency
under the Article 33 Rural Development Plan for Wales.

Ariennir y prosiect hwn gan Lywodraeth Cynulliad Cymru ac
fe'i rheolir gan Awdurdod Datblygu Cymru dan y Cymllun
Datblygu Gwledig Cymru Erthygl 33.

Welsh Development AgencyWelsh Assembly GovernementEU

Map of Projects....

How to find us

1. Cwm Farm Cider House, Llangattock Lingoed

2. St Cadoc's Church, Llangattock Lingoed

3. Cistercian site at Llanfair Cilgoed

4. The Well House, Cross Ash

5. Traveller's Seat, Skenfrith

6. Corn Barn at Great Trerhew Farm

7. Pigscotts at Upper White Castle Farm

8. The Croft Barn

Abergavenny can be reached from the east via the M4, A449 and A40, or the M5, M50 and A40; from the north via the A465 from Hereford; from the west via the A465 or A40; and from the south via the M4 and A4042

Croft Barn

Download:  PDF

The Croft Barn is situated approximately one mile north of White Castle on land originally part of the Great Trerhew estate (see Great Trerhew Barn project). It is listed Grade II* as an important timber-framed barn, first recorded by Fox and Raglan (Monmouthshire Houses Part I, p62-65), with exceptionally fine carpentry. The original barn was probably wholly timber-framed and the stone gables added later. The west gable has subsequently been rebuilt and the barn on this side shortened. The building illustrates a late development in cruck-truss tradition, where crucks alternate with framed trusses in the same building.  On the north side the timber panels are largely exposed and include, below eaves, rare-surviving oak stave and lattice panels with the lower panels clad by horizontal weatherboarding.

The present owners, White Castle Vineyard, first approached the Trust for help in conserving this fine sixteenth century barn in 2011. The Trust commissioned a Condition Survey by Morgan and Horowskyj Architects, Abergavenny, and dendrochronological dating of the timber was carried out, funded by the Royal Commission on Ancient and Historic Monuments of Wales. Seven samples were taken from various elements of the barn and one timber with retained sapwood was found to have been felled in spring 1581, with supporting date range for two other samples. The study by the Oxford Dendrochronology Laboratory (report 2012/49) concludes that the barn was constructed in 1581.

The Trust has worked with the owners to secure funds from CADW and the Heritage Lottery Fund to conserve this important building and to use it as a learning centre for wine growing skills and heritage activities.

Croft Before
MORE INFORMATION:
LOTTERY FUNDING AWARD
Croft Waffle
MORE INFORMATION:
WATTLE PANELS REPLACED
Heritage Lottery Fund
Cadw

Sense of Roots

The Trust was appointed as the delivery agent (2011 – 2013) under the Monmouthshire Rural Development Plan for two grant schemes: Bringing Your Village Alive and Sense of Roots.

Sense of Roots provided grants for projects that bring to life Monmouthshire's rich agricultural, industrial and cultural heritage. The grants cover items such as installation of interpretation boards, signage for heritage trails, oral history equipment etc.

Mathern Mill

£8,000 (63% of total project cost) for interpretation boards and digital display.

This interesting mill, complete with machinery, will open to visitors for open days with funding for interpretation boards and a digital display.

Mathern Mill A
Exterior
Mathern Mill C
Machinery
Mathern Mill B
Water Wheel

Nelson Garden, Monmouth

£4,848 (80% of total project cost) for interpretation boards and the resurfacing of a circular path around the garden.

The Nelson Garden Trust that looks after this Listed 18th century garden in the centre of Monmouth will receive funding to provide interpretation boards and to resurface a circular path around  the garden.

Nelson Garden before B
Before
Nelson Garden path works C
Work in progress
Nelson Garden path works A
Work in progress
Nelson Garden before A
Before
Nelson Garden path works D
Work in progress
Nelson Garden path works B
Work in progess

Raglan Roots

£8,000 (80% of total project cost) for a digital town map and plaques with QR codes linked to Raglan Wikipedia town.

Raglan History Society's project will provide links through digital networks to the society's extensive database of information about the village. A digital town map and plaques with QR codes linked to Raglan Wikipedia town. Will be placed on buildings and in Raglan churchyard.

Raglan A
Raglan Church
Raglan B
Involving the children
Raglan C
Involving the children

St Mary's Churchyard, Tintern

£8,000 (62.4% of total project cost) for interpretation in the churchyard and refurbishment of a large tomb.

Tintern Community Council will use the grant to provide interpretation in St. Mary's churchyard and to refurbish an architecturally significant tomb.

Usk Rural Life Museum

£7,672 (80% of total project cost) for portable digital display units for agricultural shows etc.

The popular rural life museum will receive funding for portable digital display units to be taken to agricultural shows  and other events promoting rural life in Monmouthshire.

  This project has received funding through the Rural Development Plan for Wales 2007-2013 which is funded by the Welsh Government and the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development.

Cyllidwyd y prosiect hwn drwy Gynllun Datblygu Gwledig Cymru 2007-2013 a ariennir gan Lywodraeth Cymru a’r Gronfa Amaethyddol Ewrop ar gyfer Datblygu Gwledig.

The European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development
Monmouthshire County Council

Bringing Your Village Alive

The Trust was appointed as the delivery agent (2011 – 2013) under the Monmouthshire Rural Development Plan for two grant schemes: Bringing Your Village Alive and Sense of Roots.

Bringing Your Village Alive provided grants for projects that enhanced the heritage and visual appeal of selected rural Conservation Areas. The grants cover improvements to building frontages, railings, walls, public buildings and public spaces.  Each project demonstrates community benefit.

Anchor Inn, Tintern

£39,660 (80% of total project cost) for the refurbishment of the exterior of the coach house and surroundings.

This project is seen by visitors to the famous Tintern Abbey with the Anchor Inn alongside.  The project will refurbish the exterior of a coach house and provide traditional paving around.

Anchor Inn
The Anchor Inn
Anchor Watergate
Watergate
Anchor Gable End
Gable End

Caerwent Churchyard

£6,752 (80% of total project cost) for rebuilding collapsing walls.

The funding helped to restore the boundary walls using traditional materials and techniques. Chairman of the Churchyard Maintenance committee, David Evans, said, “The churchyard of St. Stephen's and St. Tathan's church is surrounded by an ancient stone wall which was falling into a very bad state of repair.  Over the past few years a group of volunteers has been tidying the areas adjacent to the walls by clearing away rubbish and nettles.  Thanks to this funding, the churchyard maintenance group were able to employ a local stonemason to repair and rebuild the walls where necessary.  The project officer and the Village Alive Trust were a great help in seeing the work through.”

Caerwent before
Before
Caerwent after
After

Grosmont Town Hall

£6,921 (80% of total project cost) for re-painting and the provision of a rail for disabled access on the exterior stairs.

The Town Hall stands in the centre of this lovely village which has many visitors to Grosmont Castle and ancient church of St. Nicholas. The Crucorney Community Council managed and part funded the project to provide a rail for disabled access on exterior stairs and refurbishment of exterior woodwork and redecoration

Grosmont Before
Steps Before
Grosmont After
Steps After

Llantilio Crossenny Church

£5,000 (7.19% of total project cost) for replacement of shingle on the spire (part of a wider re-roofing scheme).

The church council worked hard to secure major grants for urgent repairs to the spire of St. Teilo's church, a landmark for miles.  Bringing Your Village Alive support provided replacement shingles for the spire as part of a larger restoration project.

Llan Cross spire before
Before
Llan Cross spire new shingles at base
New shingles at base
Llan Cross spire shingles going on
Shingles going on
Llan Cross Spire after
After

Shaftesbury House, 67 Monnow St, Monmouth

£34,862.11(80% total project cost) for the exterior refurbishment of the street frontage.Shaftesbury House , an important building on Momouth's main street, is in urgent need of sympathetic restoration.  The funding will secure improvements to the exterior with refurbishment of original features.  The project will also provide  training in traditional craft skills.

Shaftesbury House before
Before

Singleton House, 20 Monk St, Monmouth

£6,418.67 (80% total project cost).This project on a busy road into Monmouth will restore exterior flagstones and refurbish surrounding railings.

Singleton House painting under way
Painting under way

St Arvans Church Tower

£8,000 (31.5% of total project cost) for the replacement of tiles with stone on the tower roof (part of a wider re-roofing scheme).Parishioners could not proceed with major restoration of the church roof without additional funding for the replacement of slate tiles with stone tiles on church tower roof. With funding through the Rural Development Plan for Wales delivered by the Village Alive Trust, the project has restored an original feature and supported a larger restoration project.

St Arvans Roof before
Before
St Arvans roof stripped
Stripped
St Arvans tower roof nearing completion
Nearing completion
St Arvans Roof during
St Arvans roof ridge tiles

This project has received funding through the Rural Development Plan for Wales 2007-2013 which is funded by the Welsh Government and the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development.Cyllidwyd y prosiect hwn drwy Gynllun Datblygu Gwledig Cymru 2007-2013 a ariennir gan Lywodraeth Cymru a’r Gronfa Amaethyddol Ewrop ar gyfer Datblygu Gwledig.

The European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development
Monmouthshire County Council